Identity chips will soon track everything -- including you

June 27 2008 / by futuretalk / In association with Future Blogger.net
Category: Information   Year: General   Rating: 8 Hot

By Dick Pelletier

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chips will soon be used in stores at point-of-sale checkout to replace cashiers. Sensors can detect purchases and automatically charge your ATM or credit card – or direct you to a cash machine. Merchants eliminate cashiers, and in our competitive world, some of the savings gets passed on to customers in lower prices.

Wal-Mart recently ordered 100 of its suppliers to place RFID tags on pallets and cases. They plan to start with inventory control, and evolve into this new technology over the coming years. Target, Home Depot, Kroger, Safeway, and most other stores are expected to follow soon.

This revolutionary identification system also gives merchants more security. If a certain Beverly Hills store had installed RFID tags, a famous actress would not have been caught shoplifting. Sensors would have detected her purchases as she walked out the door, and automatically charged her credit card – no harm no foul.

RFID chips can also be implanted in our body. Whether it’s your little one’s first day walking home from the bus stop alone, or the millionth time she’s wandered too far from the house, a chip under her collarbone reports her exact location. You chart her every move. This allows her to become more independent, and it gives you greater peace of mind.

This is not as futuristic as it sounds. Driven by 9/11, the Department of Homeland Security, in its US-VISIT program, is testing biometrics in a $15 billion attempt to build a “virtual border” around the country. This high-priority project will use facial recognition, fingerprint, hand geometry, and iris and voice recognition in an attempt to separate bad guys from good guys.

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RFID for Identity Documents May Not Fly in the Future

February 11 2009 / by Alvis Brigis / In association with Future Blogger.net
Category: Gadgets   Year: 2009   Rating: 6 Hot

White/Grey-hat hacker Chris Paget demonstrates a $250 mobile device that can read and clone RFID tags embedded in United States passport cards and enhanced drivers' licenses.

As I often remind readers, accelerating technology cuts both ways and forces us to bolster our info-immune system.

(via The Register)

Future of Shopping - RFID gets under your skin

April 13 2008 / by futuretalk / In association with Future Blogger.net
Category: Information   Year: General   Rating: 5 Hot

By Dick Pelletier

You enter the supermarket, grab an electronic shopping cart that recognizes you from your touch, and begin tossing items into pre-opened bags. The monitor on your “smart cart” not only displays each item, its price, and total amount spent; but also subtracts items returned to the shelf. Hold an item in your hand briefly and its description appears on the monitor.

When finished shopping, simply tap a “chipped” finger indicating which credit or debit card to use, or tap thumb for cash pay, which directs you to an automated cash machine – then out the door. On exit, select a security option to deactivate or encrypt all product chips, preventing evildoers from tracking you or your merchandise.

Though this futuristic scenario may still be a few years away, Albertson’s Chicago and Dallas area stores are experimenting with “Shop ‘n Scan”, a wireless scanner shoppers use to ring up groceries as they take them off the shelf. Eventually, Albertson’s wants to integrate this with other services that could one day become the precursor to a scenario like the one described above.

Milwaukee futurist David Zach envisions a bright future for RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification). “Chipped” tickets to local Miller Park sporting events, for example, allows management to recognize customers. Move to a more expensive seat during the game, and the system debits your account for the higher priced seat. (cont.)

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Ag Industry Gets Tagged for RFID Implementation

June 06 2008 / by juldrich / In association with Future Blogger.net
Category: Business & Work   Year: 2011   Rating: 5 Hot

by Jack Uldrich

Cross-posted from www.jumpthecurve

The government of New Zealand is reportedly planning on tagging all cattle with RFID chips by 2011. The development is a harbinger of things to come for the U.S. agricultural industry. In addition to letting farmers and ranchers track individual cattle by the age, sex and breed, the chips will also allow agri-business to monitor the animal all the way from the farm to your local grocery store.

This tracability will allow consumers to know everything from what anti-biotics the animal was injected with, to whether it was fed with organic feed and raised in a “free-range” environment. The tracibility will also ensure that businesses and governments are quickly able to recall meat in the event of a disease outbreak.

When one further considers how “smart” smart-phones will get in the future, I can easily envision consumers soon using their phones to scan products in the store for information – including genetic information – before they actually make a purchase. (cont.)

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Voice-enabled ID chips will soon make our lives more efficient

September 03 2008 / by futuretalk / In association with Future Blogger.net
Category: Other   Year: General   Rating: 1

By Dick Pelletier

You enter the supermarket, grab an electronic cart that recognizes you from your touch, toss in some bags and begin shopping. The monitor on your ‘smart cart’ displays products, price, and total amount spent; and even subtracts items returned to the shelf.

As you wind through the aisles, the cart’s voice recognizes products you’re running low on, and offers special discounts just for you. When finished shopping, simply tap a ‘chipped’ finger indicating payment preference and walk out the door – no more lines or grocery clerks to deal with. On exit, select an option to deactivate or encrypt all chips, which protects your privacy by preventing evildoers from tracking you or your merchandise.

After putting items away at home, the milk might say, “I expire in nine days, would you like a 24-hour reminder”, or the hat you purchased may say, “Hey Dick, why not wear me now, you know how great I make you look”.

By 2012, experts believe the above scenarios could be happening at stores everywhere.

Milwaukee futurist David Zach agrees that voice-enabled chips will increase efficiency. Clothes could remark, “Don’t wash me with colors”; cars may cry out, “I need oil”, and a glass might tell the bartender, “he’s had enough”.

Wearable computer maker Vocollect believes their voice-enabled machines can team up with RFID (Radio Frequency ID) chips used to identify items, and create an enormous array of exciting applications.

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